Monday, November 24, 2008

Microsoft's Cloud Strategy: How they plan to rout Google


This could come to Google as a massive surprise. The economy is under pressure. A lot of Microsoft's customers will be forced to think to move their applications, if not the whole data center, to the clouds.

Google may have had luck with the silent rise in the search/query 1.0 world, but this is more complex. Microsoft is investing heavily in its 30 20 odd hi-fi data centers and they surely want to get into the data crunching game as well.

Will the consumers listen? And who will they turn to is the big question. The rush for gold has begun but I hope that those billions of dollars haven't been thrown in for nothing. What if no one comes to your data center?

We'll soon do a detailed SWOT analysis on the Cloud Data Center build up. For now, check out the BW's article:

Corporate America is increasingly leaving computing to the experts. Why go to the trouble and expense of building and managing complex systems to handle your spiraling data-crunching needs when another company can do it for you? And who better, faster, or cheaper than Google (GOOG)?

That's just the kind of conventional wisdom Debra Chrapaty wants to change. As Microsoft's (MSFT) vice-president for Global Foundation Services, Chrapaty wants to prove that her company is no less capable of running the sprawling data centers to offer software doled out via the Internet. The company is especially keen to handle the ubiquitous Microsoft software that consumers and corporations have been running for themselves for the past few decades. "Google has done a great job of hyping" its prowess, Chrapaty says. "But we're neck and neck with them."

And if Microsoft isn't there yet, it may be soon. Chrapaty, who's in charge of Microsoft's data centers, is stepping up a multibillion-dollar building binge, BusinessWeek has learned. Her group is embarking on a plan to build in the coming years some 20 supersize data centers that can cost as much as $1 billion apiece, according to a person familiar with Microsoft's plans. "We're going to reinvent the infrastructure of our industry," Chrapaty says. She declines to discuss specifics of the plan.


Source

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