Skip to main content

Cloud Computing rather use Cloud DBs than RDBMS

All the fat cash cows that have bee fetching billions of dollars annually such as Oracle RDBMS, Office apps etc will have to make way to the light-weight apps and dbs. Small footprint VMs, all containarized and secured. Transactional VMs, maybe that's what we'll call them someday inthe clouds.


One thing you won't find underlying a cloud computing initiative is a relational database. And this is no accident: Relational databases are ill-suited for use within cloud computing environments, argued Geir Magnusson, vice president of engineering at 10Gen, an on-demand platform servicer provider.

Magnusson, who also helped write the Apache Geronimo application server software, spoke at the O'Reilly Web 2.0 conference, being held this week in New York.

"Cloud computing is different kind of technology,” he said. “It is different enough it will change how we do things as developers. We will have to re-examine how we build things.”

During his talk, Magnusson listed a number of new databases created specifically to work in a cloud computing environment. They include Google's Bigtable, Amazon's SimpleDB, 10Gen's own Mongo, AppJet's AppJet database and the Oracle open-source BerkelyDB.

None of these databases, Magnusson pointed out, are relational ones (He did point out one notable exception, a version MySQL tweaked for Web environments, called Drizzle.

These databases all have characteristics that make them uniquely suited to serving cloud computing-styled applications. Most of these databases can be run in distributed environments — meaning that they can be spread out over multiple servers in multiple locations. None of them are transactional in nature. And they all sacrifice some advanced querying capability for faster performance (In many cases, these databases can be queried using object calls, rather than SQL queries, which programmers are far more comfortable working with anyway.)


Source

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Get Vyatta Virtual Appliance, now VMware certified!

We all know Vyatta, don't we?

Vyatta, the leader in Linux-based networking, today announced that its open-source networking software has received VMware Virtual Appliance Certification, thereby providing customers with a solution that has been optimized for a production-ready VMware environment. The company also announced it has joined the VMware Technology Alliance Partner (TAP) Program. As a member of TAP, Vyatta will offer its solutions via the TAP program website. With the Vyatta virtual appliance for VMware environments, organizations can now include Vyatta’s router, firewall and VPN functions as part of their virtualized infrastructure.

Vyatta combines enterprise-class routing and security capabilities into an integrated, reliable and commercially supported software solution, delivering twice the performance of proprietary network solutions at half the price. Running Vyatta software as virtual appliances gives customers many more options for scaling their data centers and cons…

3PAR adds native LDAP support to simplify administration

3PAR®, the leading global provider of utility storage, announced today native support for lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP). Support for LDAP enables centralized user authentication and authorization using a standard protocol for managing access to IT resources. With 3PAR’s support for LDAP, customers are able to now integrate 3PAR Utility Storage--a simple, cost-efficient, and massively scalable storage platform—with standard, open enterprise directory services. The result is simplified security administration with centralized access control and identity management.

“3PAR Utility Storage already provides us with a reliable, shared, and easy-to-use consolidated storage platform,” said Burzin Engineer, Vice President of Infrastructure Services at Shopzilla. "Now, with 3PAR support for LDAP, managing security commonly--across all our resources, including storage--is also simple and efficient.”

Press Release

DeepLearningTrucker Part 1