Monday, September 22, 2008

Cloud Computing rather use Cloud DBs than RDBMS


All the fat cash cows that have bee fetching billions of dollars annually such as Oracle RDBMS, Office apps etc will have to make way to the light-weight apps and dbs. Small footprint VMs, all containarized and secured. Transactional VMs, maybe that's what we'll call them someday inthe clouds.


One thing you won't find underlying a cloud computing initiative is a relational database. And this is no accident: Relational databases are ill-suited for use within cloud computing environments, argued Geir Magnusson, vice president of engineering at 10Gen, an on-demand platform servicer provider.

Magnusson, who also helped write the Apache Geronimo application server software, spoke at the O'Reilly Web 2.0 conference, being held this week in New York.

"Cloud computing is different kind of technology,” he said. “It is different enough it will change how we do things as developers. We will have to re-examine how we build things.”

During his talk, Magnusson listed a number of new databases created specifically to work in a cloud computing environment. They include Google's Bigtable, Amazon's SimpleDB, 10Gen's own Mongo, AppJet's AppJet database and the Oracle open-source BerkelyDB.

None of these databases, Magnusson pointed out, are relational ones (He did point out one notable exception, a version MySQL tweaked for Web environments, called Drizzle.

These databases all have characteristics that make them uniquely suited to serving cloud computing-styled applications. Most of these databases can be run in distributed environments — meaning that they can be spread out over multiple servers in multiple locations. None of them are transactional in nature. And they all sacrifice some advanced querying capability for faster performance (In many cases, these databases can be queried using object calls, rather than SQL queries, which programmers are far more comfortable working with anyway.)


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