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Bloggers bound to influence tech industry like never before!

I was reading this post of Eric and instead of talking about how hot tech industry has suddenly become, I want to focus on a more serious issue where suddenly as bloggers, who may also be working in the same industry, which sometimes is the case, you have to be cautious to say something "negative".

Really, you ought to read the comments I got on my post last week complaining about the problems I was having connecting to the MLB.com audio service for a couple of baseball playoff games. The service uses the content-delivery network operated by Akamai (AKAM). I expressed irritation that I was getting booted off the service every few minutes for no apparent reason.

It wasn't a stock call; I was simply venting. Well, within 24 hours, I had more than 70 comments, most of them dripping with venom; I was under attack from Akamai's Army. (Friday, an Akamai spokesman said the company believes the problem involved security software running on our servers.) And it isn't just Akamai: there are legions of wildly enthusiastic fans for many tech stocks. Apple fans are the most vocal, which should come as no surprise. But I'm seeing comparable fervor for Intel (INTC), Sirius Satellite Radio (SIRI) and Research In Motion, as well as for smaller names like Marvell (MRVL), Cree Research (CREE; see Plugged In.), Omnivision (OVTI) and Local.com (LOCM). There's no tolerance for dissent; last week's bearish call on Intel and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) by Mark Lipacis, Morgan Stanley's new chip analyst -- he thinks the microprocessor segment is beset by double-ordering and will see an inventory problem -- was met by reader comments on my blog expressing absolute bafflement that anyone could envision Intel stock slipping.


As a blogger you have come to shoulder the responsibility of playing good and neutral, but you may have to bring out the "irritating experiences" with a product or site in a more polished manner. I personally feel that it is not really a responsibility vested on his/her shoulders but as you see one day you might even affect a company's stock!

Look at boycott novell blogs around the web, they are literally breaking down Novell from outsides-in.

Anyways check out his post, it is actually about the tech buzz

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