Skip to main content

Virtualization remains a tough sell

You can sell virtualization when:

  • People really need to consolidate. Really!
  • People don't know anything about it. (Not the ethical way to promote it, I know, but I'm just telling you how it is)
  • People don't fear virtualization
  • People don't spend too much time discussing over discussions, they lose focus amidst all the FUD
  • People don't let competitors confuse THEM while spreading FUD. note: Remember FUD spreaders don't necessarily have to come from within, they can be external elements
  • People really aren't afraid of change


One large financial services firm configured its own server, locked it down and delivered it to iQor to run. “And don’t touch it," the client ordered, according to Sabatelli.

“What I did in that instance was convert the physical box over to a virtual box without their knowledge," Sabatelli recounted during a VMware customer panel at the VMworld 2007 this week. “They came back later and asked, ’Is everything OK with the box?’"

Once the client was satisfied things were in order, Sabatelli confessed that he had converted the firm’s server to a virtual box. “And he said, 'It’s a what?’" Sabatelli recalled.

Such confusion is not uncommon.


Check it out.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Security: VMware Workstation 6 vulnerability

vulnerable software: VMware Workstation 6.0 for Windows, possible some other VMware products as well type of vulnerability: DoS, potential privilege escalation I found a vulnerability in VMware Workstation 6.0 which allows an unprivileged user in the host OS to crash the system and potentially run arbitrary code with kernel privileges. The issue is in the vmstor-60 driver, which is supposed to mount VMware images within the host OS. When sending the IOCTL code FsSetVoleInformation with subcode FsSetFileInformation with a large buffer and underreporting its size to at max 1024 bytes, it will underrun and potentially execute arbitrary code. Security focus

Larry Ellison's NetSuite IPO soars

Here at Google's Finance Bloomberg covering: NetSuite Inc., the software maker majority-owned by Oracle Corp.'s Larry Ellison, rose for a second day after its initial stock sale, advancing 10 percent as investors seek to tap demand for business programs. The San Mateo, California-based company's applications handle accounting, inventory management and sales tasks over the Internet. They were designed for firms with 1,000 or fewer employees. Small-business spending on that type of software will outpace corporate purchases through at least 2010, NetSuite said this week, citing research firm Gartner Inc. The stock rose $3.64 to $39.14 at 4 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading, after a 37 percent gain yesterday in its debut. The company raised $161.2 million, selling 6.2 million shares for $26 each. Bloomberg here.

Splunk that!

Saw this advert on Slashdot and went on to look for it and found the tour pretty neat to look at. Check out the demo too! So why would I need it? WHY NOT? I'd say. As an organization grows , new services, new data comes by, new logs start accumulating on the servers and it becomes increasingly difficult to look at all those logs, leave alone that you'd have time to read them and who cares about analysis as the time to look for those log files already makes your day, isn't it? Well a solution like this is a cool option to have your sysadmins/operators look at ONE PLACE and thus you don't have your administrators lurking around in your physical servers and *accidentally* messing up things there. Go ahead and give it a shot by downloading it and testing it. I'll give it a shot myself! Ok so I went ahead and installed it. Do this... [root@tarrydev Software]# ./splunk-Server-1.0.1-linux-installer.bin to install and this (if you screw up) [root@tarrydev Sof