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NetApp exec jumps ship to launch Cloud Storage Company called ParaScale

CUPERTINO, Calif., June 10, 2008 – Storage industry veteran Sajai Krishnan will take the top office at Parascale, a startup company developing cloud storage solutions for rich-media content in traffic-intense applications. As Parascale’s new CEO, Krishnan will steer the company’s launch into software to power highly scalable cloud storage solutions.

Krishnan comes to Parascale from NetApp, where he served five years. He was most recently the general manager of the company’s StoreVault business unit that focuses on network storage appliances for mid-market businesses. Krishnan also served as the general manager of NetApp’s Storage Management Software business, overseeing the company’s core management products.

“As technology and demand trends converge, I am really excited about the opportunity Parascale has to dramatically change the economics of digital content storage,” said Krishnan. “For businesses that aim to deliver rich-media, data storage is a major expense item in their P&L. Similarly, data storage is a major part of the cost of solutions in video surveillance, medical imaging, oil and gas, and other content-heavy verticals. Parascale software will enable 100% standard Linux servers to be knitted together into petabyte-sized data farms using 100% standard file-serving protocols, providing massive throughput and automatic load-balancing with minimal management. Working with solution and channel partners, Parascale will crack-the-code for cloud storage and enable content-businesses to roll their own clouds and service-providers to build the scalable infrastructure for their hosted content storage businesses.”

Parascale’s Cloud Storage (PCS) software aggregates multiple standard Linux servers to present one highly scalable virtual file-storage appliance, accessible via standard file access protocols like NFS, HTTP and FTP. PCS is patented technology which automatically and transparently migrates and replicates files among storage nodes to balance and optimize performance – without any interruption in client access.

“Sajai’s success in evangelizing innovative storage solutions to a global base of customers utilizing novel demand generation methods and leveraging channels, in addition to his vision of how storage for digital content is evolving, makes him the ideal choice to lead a team of individuals who have come together to present a radically new experience in storage management for digital content,” said Parascale co-founder and CTO Cameron Bahar. In addition to Bahar, Krishnan joins an accomplished team, all veterans of industry heavyweights such as IBM, HP, Sun, Symantec/Veritas, and Teradata.

Before his tenure at NetApp, Krishnan served as vice president at Booz Allen & Hamilton and as a partner within the company’s Communications, Media Technology (CMT) practice. While there he served as a business consultant to clients in the wireless, software, telecommunication, cable, networking and systems arenas. Krishnan previously worked at Sun Microsystems as a member of the company’s technical staff.

Krishnan has an MBA from The Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania as well as a master’s degree in computer science from Rice University. He earned a bachelor’s degree in electronics engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Madras.

About Parascale Inc.
Founded in 2004 by industry veteran Cameron Bahar, Parascale is headquartered in Silicon Valley. The company's primary markets are media and entertainment. Additionally, Parascale provides a platform for easily handling content in the oil and gas, medical imaging, video surveillance and genomic industries. Members of Parascale's founding engineering team have successfully delivered distributed operating systems and distributed file systems for companies including Sun (Sun Cluster), HP (Open SSI), Teradata (Teradata RDBMS), and IBM (AIX TCF). Parascale is financed by a syndicate, led by the Oskuoy Group, that includes seed-round investors in Google and PayPal. For more information, contact Parascale, Inc. at 3 Results Way, Cupertino, Calif. 95014; phone (408) 716-7010; fax (408) 716-7011 or visit www.parascale.com.
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