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IBM bungs 25,000th Storage Unit at Pittsburg Univ.

The University of Pittsburgh has more than 33,000 full- and part-time students along with more than 12,000 faculty and staff at its five western Pennsylvania campuses. In the past, the technology needs of the university -- student records, e-mail, archives, school records, employee information and mission critical applications -- resided on disparate storage solutions that were expanding beyond the capacity of the current infrastructure. The new infrastructure helps support the learning process by making the access to information quicker, richer, more inclusive and critically engaging.

The university needed to create an enterprise storage solution that would give it three key benefits:

-- A new storage infrastructure with the capacity to grow with the
University of Pittsburgh as needed;
-- Improved system reliability with reduced downtime, and availability
24/7/365; and
-- A significantly more manageable storage solution that could lower
costs and provide better system efficiency through virtualization.


"The University of Pittsburgh supports large enterprise systems, and the number and complexity of new systems continue to grow. To effectively manage these systems it was necessary to identify an enterprise storage solution that would leverage our existing investments in storage, make allocation of storage flexible and responsive to project needs, provide centralized management, and offer the reliability and stability we require. The integrated IBM storage solution met these requirements," said Jinx Walton, Director of Computing Services and Systems Development at the University of Pittsburgh.

The University of Pittsburgh's total solution will consist of the IBM SAN Volume Controller storage virtualization solution spread across two IBM System Storage DS8300 systems utilizing CISCO SAN switches, which will be used for Tier 1 and Tier 2 storage needs. An IBM System Storage DS4800 will be used for Tier 3 and back-up, while IBM Tivoli Productivity Center (TPC) will manage the entire environment. More than 325 terabytes of data will be stored on the new infrastructure -- the equivalent of storing more than 162 billion pages of text.


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